Wilton Diptych

Wilton Diptych - GPH-205: Required reading! Some of this...

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Gothic “International” Style: The Wilton Diptych (circa 1395-99 AD; egg tempera medium) English King Richard II presented to the Virgin and Child by his Patron Saint John the Baptist and Saints Edward and Edmund (approx. 19” x 24”) The “Wilton Diptych'”was painted as a portable altarpiece for the private devotion of King Richard II, who ruled England from 1377 to 1399. The diptych is thought to have been made in the last five years of Richard's reign although its artist remains unknown. It is called The Wilton Diptych because it came from Wilton House in Wiltshire, the seat of the Earls of Pembroke. A diptych is a painting, carving or piece of metalwork on two panels usually hinged like a book. The panels of the Wilton Diptych are made of north European oak but have been transformed by immaculate painting and gilding into a heavenly vision. King Richard II kneels at the feet of the Virgin and Child and 11 angels. Behind him is Saint John the Baptist, Saint Edward the Confessor and Saint Edmund. The saints are recognizable by their attributes: the lamb of
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Wilton Diptych - GPH-205: Required reading! Some of this...

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