Chapt7,ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 9th edition by Stephen P. Robbins Prentice Hall International[1]

Chapt7,ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 9th edition by Stephen P. Robbins Prentice Hall International[1]

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1 In this chapter, "we review a number of motivation techniques and programs that have gained varying degrees of acceptance in practice. And for each of the techniques and programs we review, we specifically address how they build on one or more of the motivation theories covered in the previous chapter" ( p. 188/189). CHAPTER 7 MOTIVATION: FROM CONCEPT TO APPLICATIONS
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2 MANAGEMENT BY OBJECTIVES (MBO) " Management by objectives emphasizes participatively set goals that are tangible, verifiable, and measurable… MBO's appeal undoubtedly lies in its emphasis on converting overall organizational objectives into specific objectives for organizational units and individual members. MBO operationalizes the concept of objectives by devising a process by which objectives cascade down through the organization" (p. 189). tangible = greifbar, spürbar MBO: A program that encompasses specific goals, participatively set, for an explicit time period, with feedback on goal progress.
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3 EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION PROGRAMS "Recognition can take many forms. You can personally congratulate an employee in private for a good job. You can send a handwritten note or an e-mail message acknowledging something positive that the employee has done. For employees with a strong need for social acceptance, you can publicly recognize accomplishments. And to enhance group cohesiveness and motivation, you can celebrate team successes. You can use meeting to recognize the contributions and achievements of successful work teams" (p. 192). "One of the most well-known and widely used recognition devices is the use of suggestion systems. Employees offer suggestions for improving processes or cutting costs and are recognized with small cash awards. The Japanese have been especially effective at making suggestion systems work" (p. 193).
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4 EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT PROGRAMS "Employee involvement has become a convenient catchall term to cover a variety of techniques. For instance, it encompasses such popular ideas as employee participation or participative management, workplace democracy, empowerment, and employee ownership… We define it as a participative process that uses the entire capacity of employees and is designed to encourage increased commitment to the organizations's success. The underlying logic is that by involving workers in those decisions that affect them and by increasing their autonomy and control over their work lives, employees will become more motivated, more committed to the organization, more productive, and more satisfied with their jobs" (p. 193). Are participation and employee involvement synonyms? "No. Participationis a more limited term. It's a subset within the larger framework of employee involvement. All of the employee involvement programs we describe include some form of employee participation but the term participation, per se, is too narrow and limiting" (p. 193). subset = Untermenge, Teilmenge
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5 EXAMPLES: a) Participative Management A process in which subordinates share a significant degree of
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 110 taught by Professor Kannan during the Spring '11 term at Anna University.

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Chapt7,ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 9th edition by Stephen P. Robbins Prentice Hall International[1]

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