Measuring Dysfunctional Attitudes in the General Population The Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (form A

Measuring Dysfunctional Attitudes in the General Population The Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (form A

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 Cognitive Therapy and Research Journal List > Springer Open Choice Formats: Abstract | Full Text| PDF (231K)
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Cognit Ther Res. 2009 August; 33(4): 345–355. Published online 2009 January 20. doi: 10.1007/s10608-009-9229-y . PMCID: PMC2712063 Copyright © The Author(s) 2009 Measuring Dysfunctional Attitudes in the General Population: The Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (form A) Revised L. Esther de Graaf, Jeffrey Roelofs, and Marcus J. H. Huibers Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands L. Esther de Graaf, Phone: +31-43-3881613, Fax: +31-43-3884155, Email: E.deGraaf/at/dmkep.unimaas.nl . Corresponding author. Received September 26, 2007; Accepted January 6, 2009. Other Sections▼ Abstract Introduction Method Results Discussion Conclusion References Abstract The Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) was designed to measure the intensity of dysfunctional attitudes, a hallmark feature of depression. Various exploratory factor analytic studies of the DAS form A (DAS-A) yielded mixed results. The current study was set up to compare the fit of various factor models. We used a large community sample ( N = 8,960) to test the previously proposed factor models of the DAS-A using confirmatory factor analysis. The retained model of the DAS-A was subjected to reliability and validity analyses. All models showed good fit to the data. Finally, a two-factor solution of the DAS-A was retained, consisting of 17 items. The factors demonstrated good reliability and convergent construct validity. Significant associations were found with depression. Norm-scores were presented. We advocate the use of a 17- item DAS-A, which proved to be useful in measuring dysfunctional beliefs. On the basis of previous psychometric studies, our study provides solid evidence for a two-factor model of the DAS-A, consisting of ‘dependency’ and ‘perfectionism/performance evaluation’. Keywords: Dysfunctional attitude scale, Depression, General population, Psychometric analysis, Factor structure Other Sections▼ Abstract Introduction Method Results Discussion PubMed articles by these authors de Graaf, L. Roelofs, J. Huibers, M. PubMed related articles Evaluating the invariance and validity of the structure of dysfunctional attitudes in an adolescent population. Assessment. 2009 Sep; 16(3):258-73. Epub 2008 Oct 6. [Assessment. 2009] The reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale Form A (DAS-A) in a community sample.
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