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Unformatted text preview: Stress management From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation , search This article's introduction section may not adequately summarize its contents . To comply with Wikipedia's lead section guidelines , please consider expanding the lead to provide an accessible overview of the article's key points. (January 2010) This article may need to be wikified to meet Wikipedia's quality standards . Please help by adding relevant internal links , or by improving the article's layout . (January 2010) Stress management is the amelioration of stress and especially chronic stress often for the purpose of improving everyday functioning. Stress produces numerous symptoms which vary according to persons, situations, and severity. These can include physical health decline as well as depression . Contents [ hide ] 1 Historical foundations 2 Models of stress management o 2.1 Transactional model o 2.2 Health realization/innate health model 3 Techniques of stress management o 3.1 Measuring stress o 3.2 Effectiveness of stress management 4 See also 5 References 6 External links [ edit ] Historical foundations Walter Cannon and Hans Selye used animal studies to establish the earliest scientific basis for the study of stress. They measured the physiological responses of animals to external pressures, such as heat and cold, prolonged restraint, and surgical procedures, then extrapolated from these studies to human beings. [1] [2] Subsequent studies of stress in humans by Richard Rahe and others established the view that stress is caused by distinct, measureable life stressors, and further, that these life stressors can be ranked by the median degree of stress they produce (leading to the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale ). Thus, stress was traditionally conceptualized to be a result of external insults beyond the control of those experiencing the stress. More recently, however, it has been argued that external circumstances do not have any intrinsic capacity to produce stress, but instead their effect is mediated by the individual's perceptions, capacities, and understanding. [ edit ] Models of stress management [ edit ] Transactional model Richard Lazarus and Susan Folkman suggested in 1984 that stress can be thought of as resulting from an imbalance between demands and resources or as occurring when pressure exceeds one's perceived ability to cope. Stress management was developed and premised on the idea that stress is not a direct response to a stressor but rather one's resources and ability to cope mediate the stress response and are amenable to change, thus allowing stress to be controllable....
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 110 taught by Professor Kannan during the Spring '11 term at Anna University Chennai - Regional Office, Coimbatore.

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New Microsoft Office Word Document - Stress management From...

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