Teamwork and Project Management_Ch 3

Teamwork and Project Management_Ch 3 - Teamwork and Project...

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Teamwork and Project Management Smith, Karl A. Teamwork and Project Management . 2nd Ed. New York, New York: McGraw-Hill, 2004. p 25-46. 1 CHAPTER 3: Teamwork Skills and Problem Solving I will pay more for the ability to deal with people than any other ability under the sun. ~ John D. Rockefeller If you can’t operate as a team player, no matter how valuable you’ve been, You really don’t belong at GE. (1993) ~ John F. Welch CEO, General Electric IMPORTANCE OF TASK AND RELATIONSHIP As noted in Chapter 2, to be most effective, groups need to do two things very well: accomplish the task and get better at working with one another. Both of these require leadership—not just from a single person acting as a leader but from every member contributing to the leadership of the group. This chapter focuses on teamwork skills using a “distributed actions approach” to leadership. Distributed actions are specific behaviors that group members engage in to help the group accomplish its task or to improve working relationships. Napier and Gershenfeld (1973) summarize many of these behaviors (see Table 3.1). Not the date—1973—which indicates that working in groups is not a new concept. Table 3.1 Group Task and Maintenance Roles Group Task Roles Group Maintenance Roles Initiating Encouraging Seeking information Expressing feelings Giving information Harmonizing Seeking opinions Compromising Giving opinions Facilitating communications Clarifying Setting standards or goals Elaborating Testing agreement Summarizing Following Source: McNeill, Bellamy, Foster, 1995. REFLECTION : Have you been a member of a team that got the job done (wrote the report, finished the project, completed the laboratory assignment) but that ended up with the members hating one another so intensely they never wanted to see each other again? Most students have, and they have found it very frustrating. Similarly, have you been a member of a team whose members really enjoyed one another’s company and had a great time socially, but in the end hadn’t finished the project? Again, most students have, and they also have found this frustrating. Take a moment to recall your experiences with these two extremes of teamwork.
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Teamwork and Project Management Smith, Karl A. Teamwork and Project Management . 2nd Ed. New York, New York: McGraw-Hill, 2004. p 25-46. 2 Table 3.2 Management Behavior Change Needed for Team Culture From To Directing Guiding Competing Collaborating Relying on rules Focus on the process Using organizational hierarchy Using a network Consistency/sameness Diversity/flexibility Secrecy Openness/sharing Passive Risk taking Isolated decisions Involvement of others People as costs People as assets Results thinking Process thinking Source: McNeill, Bellamy, Foster, 1995. To achieve the benefits of a team culture, some changes in management behavior are needed, as
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course ENGR 2002 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at The University of Oklahoma.

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Teamwork and Project Management_Ch 3 - Teamwork and Project...

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