PE2113-Chapter 2 - Force Vectors_0825

PE2113-Chapter 2 - Force Vectors_0825 - Chapter 2 Force...

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1 Chapter 2 – Force Vectors Scalars and Vectors Procedures for Analysis
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2 Objectives To show how to add forces and resolve them into components using the Parallelogram Law To express force and position in Cartesian Vector form and explain how to determine the vector’s magnitude and direction To introduce the DOT PRODUCT in order to determine the angle between vectors or the projection of one vectors onto
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3 Scalars and Vectors Scalar is a quantity characterized by a positive or negative number. That is, it has magnitude but no direction. Generally written in italic. Examples are mass, volume, length, speed, and time Vector has magnitude as well as direction. Written with an arrow on top. Examples are displacement, acceleration,
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4 Vector Operations Multiplication and Division of a Vector by a Scalar The product or division of a vector is also a vector. However, the magnitude will change and the sense will change if the scalar is negative. A special case: if the vectors are collinear (that is, on the same straight line), the resultant is formed by algebraic or scalar addition. Vector Addition The addition of vectors A and B results in a resultant R = A + B. This can be achieved using the Parallelogram Law. Vector Subtraction The resultant difference between vectors A and B results in a resultant R’ = A B . Resolution of Vector A vector may be resolved into two components having
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Vector Addition of Forces Since force is a vector, it adds according to the parallelogram law. Two common problems in statics involve either finding resultant of force, knowing its components or resolving a known force into two components. If more than two forces are to be added, successive application of the parallelogram law is carried out in order to obtain the resultant force. Using
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course PE 2113 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at The University of Oklahoma.

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PE2113-Chapter 2 - Force Vectors_0825 - Chapter 2 Force...

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