badmintonlecture 4 - Lecture#4...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture # 4 When you are on offense, your shots are  normally played downward, smashes,  drops and low serves.  Defensive shots are mostly delivered  upward like clears, underhand clears and  high serves.   Drive shots with a horizontal trajectory can  either be defensive or offensive.  Offensive players most often take chances  and defensive players play it safe.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lecture # 4 continued A high clear to the opponent’s deep  forehand or backhand corner can rarely be  returned crosscourt high and deep to you  diagonal corner because of the long  distance.  It could be returned with a fast clear  toward that corner, however, you will br in  the center blocking it before it reaches the  intended spot.    A shot played to the center of the  opponent’s court will place the center of  the angle of return on the center line.
Background image of page 2
Lecture # 4 continued The angle of return is as important in  badminton—like other racquet sports.  The  angle of return  is the angle the  returned shuttle takes relative to the  court’s boundaries.  To prevent from being trapped by the  angle or return, place yourself on the court  where the greater percentages of returns  are likely to return. The next bullet points  provide examples.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lecture # 4 continued Cross courting and angle of return are closely  related.  Cross court shots travel a longer distance  across the court and take more time to reach  the intended spot than down the line shots.  If you play a shuttle to your opponent’s  forehand side, anticipate the straight return to  your back side.   Your opponent can crosscourt to your  forehand side, but the longer distance gives  you more time to reach it.
Background image of page 4
Lecture # 4 continued The next bullet points provide examples of  when to do cross court shots.   Cross court when you are on balance and  are able to return to center quickly.  A cross court can be played from forehand to  forehand– this leaves the opponent  vulnerable to a backhand shot.   Move about one foot to the side of the court  to the point where you have directed the  shuttle.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 21

badmintonlecture 4 - Lecture#4...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online