Chapt01_AnOceanWorld

Chapt01_AnOceanWorld - Introductory Oceanography An Ocean...

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Introductory Oceanography
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09/24/11 Oce 1001 Prof. Rodriguez 2 An Ocean World There is no other realm where physics, chemistry, geology, and biology are so intertwined as the ocean. Composition of seawater is controlled by a combination of geological and biological processes. Sediment on the ocean floor consists of shells of microorganisms and the distribution of this sediment depends on the nature and abundance of life.
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09/24/11 Oce 1001 Prof. Rodriguez 3 Life in turns depends most strongly on the distribution of chemical nutrients in the water. Nutrient distribution depends on currents and the fluid dynamics of the oceans, which is influenced by meteorology and the geology of the oceans, etc. Only through an understanding of basic principles from all of these sciences can an understanding and appreciation of the ocean as a whole be achieved.
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09/24/11 Oce 1001 Prof. Rodriguez 4 Resources Most modern societies depend more heavily on the oceans than you might imagine. The most obvious kind of resource we extract from the ocean is food, primarily fish. Fish and shellfish are wonderful low-fat and protein- rich contributions to our diet.
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09/24/11 Oce 1001 Prof. Rodriguez 5 Fish are not the only resource we extract from the sea. We also extract a host of chemical compounds from a variety of marine species. Algin, extracted from Kel p, is an emulsifier used in everything from rubber to beer. Other compounds include anti-cancer drugs, pain- killers, and chemicals for testing vaccines for the presence of bacteria.
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09/24/11 Oce 1001 Prof. Rodriguez 6 We also harvest non-biological resources. These include things like: 1. magnesium, bromine, and salt 2. petroleum, and minerals of the continental shelf. 3. In the future, we will probably extract minerals from the deep sea floor as well.
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09/24/11 Oce 1001 Prof. Rodriguez 7
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09/24/11 Oce 1001 Prof. Rodriguez 8 Transportation We have used the seas as easy ways to transport goods. It is still far cheaper to transport goods by sea than by rail or truck, not to mention air. It requires and understanding of ocean currents For this reason, Benjamin Franklin produced the first map of the Gulf Stream over 200 years ago.
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09/24/11 Oce 1001 Prof. Rodriguez 9 Waste Repository The oceans have been the ultimate dumping
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This note was uploaded on 09/24/2011 for the course OCE 1001 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at Broward College.

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Chapt01_AnOceanWorld - Introductory Oceanography An Ocean...

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