Smith6_RiseofChristianityMedieval

Smith6_RiseofChristi - Rise of Christianity and the Medieval Period Decline of Rhetoric Quintilian claimed rhetoric had subsumed philosophy but the

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Rise of Christianity and the Medieval Period Decline of Rhetoric Quintilian claimed rhetoric had subsumed philosophy but the study of inventional theory ebbed with the conversion of Rome to the empire of the Caesars. Tacitus’ Dialogue on Oratory claimed that once democratic procedures were eliminated, rhetoric decayed. Caesar Augustus stripped the Senate of most of its powers (beginning of the Pax Roman a) and made sure the use of rhetoric could not be used against him Deliberative function atrophied after Tiberius eliminated the assemblies Caligula, Tiberius' successor, delivered eulogy to Tiberius and then continued his practices Once Christianity became a force, Nero and others persecuted the leaders Christian apologists soon began defending the Christians and their faith against false accusations (killing children, eating human flesh and drinking blood) and Justin, Melito, Tatian, Athenagoras, and Theophilus of Antioch defended Christianity at time when Rome and most cities were disorganized socially. TATIAN (AD 167) Defender of Christianity at a time when Christianity and paganism still in competition Some hostility to the older pagan religion and its basis for Christian persecution Defines Rhetoric : [the art of selling words for gold to the highest bidder, and which results in the defense of untruth and injustice]. Paraphrased in Justo L. Gonzalez (1875) Quintilian’s Institutes vol II, p. 147 TERTULIAN “What indeed has Athens to do with Jerusalem? What concord is there between the Academy and the Church?” Tertulian’s question in his Prescription against Heretics (VII) pertains to the relationship of Christianity to culture, the God of Christianity versus the gods of Greek pantheism. [Gordon H. Clark states “Tertulian is often quoted as saying, ‘I believe because it is absurd.’ Although this is not precisely what Tertulian said, his opposition to pagan culture is well known. What has the Christian in common with the philosopher, he declaims; the Church with the Academy; revelation with reason?” (Clark 1986, p. 69).] ORIGEN tried to wed Christian theology with Platonic philosophy. He theorized that God transcends reason and essence as pure spirit [isn't this Gnosticism?]—he was deemed a heretic and kicked out. Clement of Alexandria believed that the ancient Greek philosophers had functioned to prepare the way for Christianity. Opened the door for Augustine’s retrieval of pre-Christian pagans 2 centuries later.
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Clement argued that the light of the true word LOGOS had inspired the Greeks to discover many truths. (??) CONSTANTINE becomes ruler in the West (after the civil war of AD 312). He had a vision of the cross with the word hoc vince (by this conquer) and issued the Edict of Milan granting tolerance for Christians. He gave himself title of pontifex maximus , head of the church or pontiff. He presided over the Council of Nicea
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course COMS 3311 taught by Professor Ghring during the Spring '10 term at Texas Tech.

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Smith6_RiseofChristi - Rise of Christianity and the Medieval Period Decline of Rhetoric Quintilian claimed rhetoric had subsumed philosophy but the

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