notes exam 1 3315

notes exam 1 3315 - 9/26/11 Whatisuniqueabout...

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 9/26/11
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Click to edit Master subtitle style  9/26/11 What is unique about  campaign communication? COMS 3315 9/7/10
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 9/26/11 Political Participation Americans with higher socio-economic status (SES)  participate at higher rates.  Why? Participation rates generally a function of resources and  civic skills.  Have these, you’re more likely to participate. Types of Political Participation:   Voting :  most common, especially in presidential  elections.  Voting relatively inexpensive, thus more people  participate in this way.   Activity in campaigns :  Includes working for a party or a  candidate and going to rallies.   Contributing money to campaigns :  Typically, only done  by wealthy Americans, requires resources.
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 9/26/11 Types of Political Participation, continued Contacting government officials :  Writing letters,  email, phoning local, state, and national officials.   Takes time and civic skills. Community participation :  working with others to  solve problems, volunteering locally.  Trending  upwards. Interest Group participation :  Membership or  donation to interest groups.  Trending upwards. Running for office or joining local boards. Taking part in unconventional participation:   protests, marches, demonstrations. Who participates?
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 9/26/11 Voter Turn-Out Turn-out has decreased substantially in recent  decades.  High of about 65% in 1960 to less than 50%  in 1996.  In 2004, was 59%, highest since 1972. Who Votes ?   § Voting increases with education and wealth. § Young voters have lowest turn-out. § Southerners less likely to vote than Northerners. § Government employees more likely to vote. § Gender makes no difference. § Whites vote at greater rates, but once SES is taken  into account, race differences no longer exists.
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Voting Turnout, continued. Best indicator of turnout:  Registration-- requirements to  register before election increase barriers to voting. Nations w/o registration have higher turn out rates.  States  w/ lower registration requirements have higher turnout. Why Vote?  One vote never matters, so why vote? § Voting is costly, especially w/ registration and learning  complex policies.  So, how is it rational to vote? § More rational to vote if candidates offer distinct  differences.  They often do not. § Civic duty  to vote is very important. § Political Efficacy-
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course COMS 3315 taught by Professor Gantt during the Fall '11 term at Texas Tech.

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notes exam 1 3315 - 9/26/11 Whatisuniqueabout...

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