Plagiarism Answers - law courts.” (footnote) This is...

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The Realist movement began primarily to correct a pervasively held misunderstanding about law, judicial power, and the function of common law courts. a. The Realist movement originated to correct a misunderstanding about law, the power of judges, and the function of courts. By any standard, this is plagiarism. It clearly borrows from the source above, paraphrases that source, and offers no citation identifying that source. b. The Realist movement originated to correct a misunderstanding about law, the power of judges, and the function of courts. (footnote) This is likely plagiarism. Yes, the writer has cited his source, but the paraphrasing closely resembles the actual text. A grading stickler would call you on this. c. “The Realist movement began primarily to correct a pervasively held misunderstanding about law, judicial power, and the function of common
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Unformatted text preview: law courts.” (footnote) This is probably OK, but I wouldn’t recommend it. At least it uses quotation marks and provides a footnote. Teachers a wary of students who rely too heavily on quotations, so be careful here. d. The Realist movement attacked the validity of legal determinism . (footnote) This is the ideal. Here, the writer accurately summarizes the statement above, but also notes to his or her reader that he or she relied on another source for this statement. Avoiding shortcuts tends to minimize plagiarism. The link below provides additional ideas about this topic. The Writing Center at OU is staffed with experts on this. Please use them when you do research and write papers. http://www.ou.edu/writingcenter/Citation_Guides/plagiarism.html...
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course BAD 2091 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at The University of Oklahoma.

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