Amino Acids - Amino Acids Group 3 By: Donna Flores...

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Amino Acids Group 3 By: Donna Flores Katherine Smith Sharon Trowell
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Amino Acids Amino Acids are the molecular units that make up proteins All proteins are various compositions of twenty specific naturally occurring amino acids The shape and other properties of each protein is dictated by the precise sequence of amino acids in it
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General Structure of an Amino Acid Each amino acid consists of an alpha carbon atom to which is attached: a hydrogen atom an amino group a carboxyl group (-COOH). This gives up a proton and is thus an acid (“amino acid”) one of 20 different “R” groups. It is the structure of the R group that determines which of the 20 it is and its special properties In the approximately 20 amino acids found in our bodies, what varies is the side chain. Some side chains are hydrophilic while others are hydrophobic. Since these side chains stick out from the backbone of the molecule, they help determine the properties of the protein made from them.
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There are 20 biologically important amino acids Alanine (Ala) ( shown ) Arginine (Arg) Asparagine (Asn) Aspartic acid (Asp) Cysteine (Cys) Glutamic acid (Glu) Glutamine (Gln) Glycine (Gly) Histidine (His) Isoleucine (Ile)
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Amino Acids - Amino Acids Group 3 By: Donna Flores...

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