Chapter 5. notes - Chapter 5 part 1 Histology-Is the study...

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Chapter 5 part 1 Histology-Is the study of Tissues The Study of Tissues Four primary tissue classes Histology (microscopic anatomy) Features of Tissue Classes Tissue = Matrix Main differences between primary tissue classes fibrous proteins ground substance clear gel called many different names (ECF, tissue fluid, interstitial fluid, tissue gel) rubbery or stony in cartilage or bone amount of space occupied by cells versus matrix connective tissue cells are widely separated by matrix – very little matrix exists between epithelial cells or muscle cells Embryonic Tissues Embryo begins as a single cell 3 Primary germ layers ectoderm (outer) endoderm (inner) mesoderm (middle) Epithelial Tissue One or more layers of closely adhering cells
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Forms a flat sheet with the upper surface exposed to the environment or an internal body cavity No room for blood vessels depends on underlying connective tissue for oxygen Sits on basement membrane (basal surface of cells) thin layer of collagen and adhesive proteins anchors epithelium to underlying connective tissue Simple Versus Stratified Epithelia Simple epithelium Stratified epithelium Simple Epithelium Types Simple Squamous Epithelium Simple Cuboidal Epithelium Absorption & secretion; produces mucus Liver, thyroid, mammary, salivary and other glands, bronchioles, and most kidney tubules Simple Columnar Epithelium Absorption & secretion; secretion of mucus Inner lining of GI tract, uterus, kidney & uterine tubes Pseudostratified Epithelium Secretes and propels respiratory mucus Found in respiratory system Stratified Epithelia Composed of more than one layer of cells & named for shape of surface cells Deepest cells sit on basement membrane
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