The Atlantic - October 24, 2008 The Atlantic Atlantic...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: October 24, 2008 The Atlantic Atlantic Revolutions, 1776-1804 Three major upheavals: 1. American Colonies (1776-1783) 2. France (1789-1795) 3. St. Dominque/Haiti (1791-1804) American War of Independence causes 1. British mercantilist policies restrict American trade to British and colonial markets 2. British levy tariffs and taxes to offset costs of policing American colonial frontier (E375,000 in 1764) Lord North Tea Act (1773) – East Indian Company to sell directly to America, bypasses American wholesalers Boston Tea Party, 1773 – People dressed up as Indians and boarded ships carrying tea as cargo and dumped them overboard End of 1775, shots fired between British regulars and militia Louis XVI (1754-1793) Royal government insolvent by 1787, unable to raise revenue, overwhelming debts, slacking trade, devastating hailstorms Estates – General – not convened since 1614 – ordered to meet in 1789 1200 deputies broken into 3 estates: 1. First Estate: Clergy (100,000) 2. Second Estate: Nobility (400,000) 3. Third Estate: All Others (96% of 27 million total) Clergy & nobility together own 35% of property, but only 5% of population Voting by orders: nobility and clergy can outvote the Third Estate by 2 to 1 “What is the Third Estate?” (1789) Abbe Sieyes Just 17 th 1789, Third Estate voted to assume the new title of assembly, and claim itself the soul body representing the nation, the national assembly Third Estate deputies locked out meet and declare intention not to disband (Tennis Court Oath, June 20, 1789) Louis XVI concedes (June 27); deputies begin writing a French constitution Awakening of the Third Estate July 14 th , 1789, Bastille prison fortress seized by Parisian mobs Peasant uprisings, attacks on chateaus, aristocratic property Two dramatic steps by National Assembly in August 1789: 1. Abolish all special privileges and tax exemptions held by nobility 2. Declaration of Rights of Man and of Citizen Louis XVI I I (1755-1824) 19 th Century conservatism: 1. Slow or no change to society (i.e. no revolution) 2. Strong, state-supported religion 3. Communal institutions and tradition, not individual rights Support for monarchies and aristocracies Restore Bourbons (1815) Resist revolutions in 1830, 1848, and 1870 John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) & Ha r r iet Taylor (1807-1858) 19 th Century Liberalism:- Emphasis on individual rights (e.g. On Liberty, 1859)- Not democracy, but some form of representative government, not divine-right monarchy- Society can be changed-reform (e.g. Jeremy Bentham)- Free trade capitalism!...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course HIST 100 taught by Professor Millskelley during the Fall '08 term at George Mason.

Page1 / 11

The Atlantic - October 24, 2008 The Atlantic Atlantic...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online