Toulmin[1] - Toulmin Model of Argument: The...

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Unformatted text preview: Toulmin Model of Argument: The twentieth-century British philosopher Stephen Toulmin noticed that good, realistic arguments typically will consist of six parts. He used these terms to describe the items. Data : The facts or evidence used to prove the argument Claim : The statement being argued (a thesis) Warrants : The general, hypothetical (and often implicit) logical statements that serve as bridges between the claim and the data. Qualifiers : Statements that limit the strength of the argument or statements that propose the conditions under which the argument is true. Rebuttals : Counter-arguments or statements indicating circumstances when the general argument does not hold true. Backing : Statements that serve to support the warrants (i.e., arguments that don't necessarily prove the main point being argued, but which do prove the warrants are true.) Toulmin's diagram of arguments typically looks something like this example: An argument written in this manner unfolds to reveal both the strengths and limits of the argument. This is as An argument written in this manner unfolds to reveal both the strengths and limits of the argument....
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course ENGL 88858 taught by Professor Brianadevaser during the Fall '11 term at Georgia State.

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Toulmin[1] - Toulmin Model of Argument: The...

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