Pamela - Aristocracy or Reward for Virtue: Pamelas...

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Unformatted text preview: Aristocracy or Reward for Virtue: Pamelas Contradictory Image Samuel Richardson uses the theme of ones social position within society in the text of Pamela: or Virtue Reward , to exemplify the transformation of Pamelas perception of herself from being lowly and poor, to her new position in the upper class. Before the wedding, Pamela describes the fine clothes she has received and states, I, like a little proud Hussy, looked in the Glass, and thought myself a Gentlewoman once more (303). Pamelas use of the word gentlewoman to describe herself contradicts the proud image of poverty and virtue she assertively held before being received into the upper class. Her conflicting persona strengthens the assertion that Pamela's true intention for defending her virtue is because it is her key to rising in class. Pamela describes extensively the low value of her clothing to incite pity, and to support her proud image of poverty she has of herself. She even describes the clothes her lady gave her as being too rich image of poverty she has of herself....
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Pamela - Aristocracy or Reward for Virtue: Pamelas...

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