Journal Chpt 8

Journal Chpt 8 - She also said that there are four main...

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Eric Hammer Professor Reaves Thursday, October 21, 2010 A Brain Scientists Explains Leadership (Forbes) It is certainly a tough road to the top, to be the leader of a team or company, but once you get there, make sure to hold onto it. It is not uncommon to see leaders flying high and then drop like a rock. Recently, this exact scenario has happened to Mark Hurd of Hewlett-Packard, Tony Hayward of BP, and Colleen Goggins of Johnson & Johnson. Dr. Helen Fisher, biological anthropologist at Rutgers University, was asked about how leaders can keep from crashing, and what insight can people have to give them the edge they need to succeed. When asked about the connection between brain chemistry and personality, she stated that personality comes from your character, including traits acquired through experiences, and temperament, which arises from biology.
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Unformatted text preview: She also said that there are four main personality types: the explorer, the director, the builder, and the negotiator. Based on knowledge, research, facts, and statistics, she said that leaders at the highest risk of making dumb mistakes have a strong mix of director and explorer traits. Dr. Fisher expressed that it is important to prepare yourself before your bad habits get the best of you, and this can be done by learning about your skills, temperament, and vulnerability. Next, you must seek to balance your achievements with a glance at your failures. It is also important to always have a plan to develop in your work. In the end, the most important thing is for executives to build a better brain sooner rather than later, because you will be more likely to led to your fullest ability and succeed over time....
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This note was uploaded on 09/27/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Gottlieb during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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