EoL - The End of Life Euthanasia and Morality James Rachels...

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The End of Life Euthanasia and Morality James Rachels (Oxford University Press, 1986) published in English, Italian, Japanese, Dutch, and Serbo-Croatian Download the book: Front Matter (.pdf file) Chapter 1 (.pdf file) Chapter 2 (.pdf file) Chapter 3 (.pdf file) Chapter 4 (.pdf file) Chapter 5 (.pdf file) Chapter 6 (.pdf file) Chapter 7 (.pdf file) Chapter 8 (.pdf file) Chapter 9 (.pdf file) Chapter 10 (.pdf file) Back Matter (.pdf file) The rest of this page contains the book's table of contents and introduction. Contents Introduction 1 1. The Western tradition The origins of the tradition 7 The doctrine of innocence 11 The importance of being human 13 Intentional killing 15 Other views about euthanasia 17 2. The sanctity of life The Eastern tradition 20 Preliminary objections to the traditional views 23 A new understanding of the sanctity of life 24 The moral rule against killing 27 Some practical implications 28 Morality and religion 36 3. Death and evil Death and suffering 39 Hedonism 45 The concept of a life 49 4. 'Innocent humans' The case of Baby Jane Doe 60 The fundamental issue 62 Subnormal lives 64 'An innocent human' 67
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5. Suicide and euthanasia Barney Clark's key 78 What the key signified 79 Suicide 80 The link to euthanasia 85 6. Debunking irrelevant distinctions Distinctions made in traditional medical ethics 88 Intentional and non-intentional termination of life 92 Ordinary and extraordinary means of treatment 96 The effect of debunking irrelevant distinctions 100 7. Active and passive euthanasia Killing and letting die 106 Practical consequences of the traditional view 108 The Bare Difference Argument 111 Counter-arguments 114 The physician's commitments 118 Thomson's objection 121 The Compromise View 123 8. Further reflections on killing and letting die The status of intuitions 129 The Jack Palance Argument 134 The No Relevant Difference Argument 139 The radical nature of the Equivalence Thesis 143 A final word about intuitions 148 9. The morality of euthanasia An absolute rule? 151 The argument from mercy 152 The argument from the Golden Rule 158 Religious arguments 160 The possibility of unexpected cures 165 10. Legalizing euthanasia Morality and law 168 How mercy-killers are treated in court 168 The slippery-slope argument 170 The argument from liberty 180 How to legalize euthanasia 182 Notes on sources 188 Index 197
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Introduction David Hume, the great Scottish philosopher of the eighteenth century, remarked that the aim of philosophy should be to replace 'superstition and false religion' with reason and understanding. Hume realized that our thinking about even the most commonplace matters may be corrupted by false assumptions--and we may take these assumptions so much for granted that we never even think of questioning them. Our moral thinking is especially vulnerable to this sort of corruption. We absorb the prejudices of our culture and the mistakes of our parents, mix in the pronouncements of our religion, add the influence of our selfishness, and then regard
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This note was uploaded on 09/27/2011 for the course PHILOSPHY 106 taught by Professor Mcmahan during the Fall '10 term at Rutgers.

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EoL - The End of Life Euthanasia and Morality James Rachels...

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