DIR1 S10 Wkshp 5 - DIRECTING FOR FILM 1 (FIL 2480) LECTURE...

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DIRECTING FOR FILM 1 (FIL 2480) MOVING CAMERA Professor: Lori Ingle lingle@mail.ucf.edu Workshop Due Monday 9am, Ingle’s Film Office Box, Com 121) NOTES “Ambiguity in perception is one of the most interesting tricks the filmmaker can employ. But what is sometimes infuriating is student incoherence that comes from ignorance of the principle of visual perception.” - Sandy Mackendrick, AMOF Pg 273 “It is… through the precise framing of a shot that the meaning of an image is communicated to the audience. “ - Sandy Mackendrick, AMOF Pg 274 CAMERA MOVEMENT Mackendrick outlines the camera move on AMOF page 273: I. There are three basic things to consider when dealing with how a camera might move: 1. the (stable) environment 2. moving figure(s) 3. the camera’s point of view (moving or not) II. There are four types of camera movement from a stationary set-up: 1. Panning (a swivel movement left or right). Katz adds the following in SBS pg 279-283: i. Pan to include space greater than can be viewed through a fixed frame. ii. Follow action as it moves. iii. Connect two or more points of interest graphically. One example, the cross pan: SBS pg 282 iv. Connect or imply a logical (narrative) connection between two or more subjects. One example, depth shifts from BG to FG: SBS pg 283 2. Tilting (a similar movement up or down) 3. Canting (a tilt from the vertical to left or right) 4. Zoom (an apparent movement, where the image is optically enlarged or reduced) III. These should be distinguished from the following where the entire camera set-up itself (camera plus dolly) is in movement: 1. Tracking (forward or backwards) SBS 298 2. Tracking (left or right) SBS pg 297 3. Craning (up or down) SBS pg 288 Rev. 2/10 1 of 8 WORKSHOP SUBJECT TO CHANGE
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DIRECTING FOR FILM 1 (FIL 2480) MOVING CAMERA Professor: Lori Ingle lingle@mail.ucf.edu Workshop Due Monday 9am, Ingle’s Film Office Box, Com 121) Two points not noted by Mackendrick (*except briefly): 1. Booming (up or down within a few feet) – usually referring to the Dolly 2. Tracking can be accomplished through the use of Tracks, the Dolly, Hand held*, Steadicam*, or the crane Mackendrick cautions that the ease of the handheld can promote capturing the action in an idle, unplanned manner. Being aware of the pictorial aspects of the film frame rather than just responding to the action seen through the lens requires thoughtful design. MOVING CAMERA MOTIVATION Mackendrick discusses camera motivation in AMOF page 274-278: “A camera move that is mistimed or a poorly planned and executed set-up can, in only a second, destroy the dramatic sense of the scene and wholly confuse the audience.” - Sandy Mackendrick, AMOF pg 274 Motivated Camera The audience is not strongly aware of the camera or the filmmaker. The subject tells us where to look, and why. An actor’s walk or a look off-screen can prompt a pan in the direction of the look. Both make the action seem natural. Film Example: North by Northwest – Cary Grant U.N. lounge (Chptr 12)
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course FIL 2480 taught by Professor Ingle during the Fall '10 term at University of Central Florida.

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DIR1 S10 Wkshp 5 - DIRECTING FOR FILM 1 (FIL 2480) LECTURE...

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