DIR1 S10 Wkshp 1 - DIRECTING FOR FILM 1 (FIL 2480) LECTURE...

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DIRECTING FOR FILM 1 (FIL 2480) LECTURE & WORKSHOP 1 Professor: Lori Ingle lingle@mail.ucf.edu NOTES CAMERA ANGLES The framing of a camera angle is what you choose to show within the frame graphically and how that supports the goal of your design at that moment. A. Size B. Over-the-shoulder (OTS) C. Two-Shot (2S), Three-Shot (3S), Four-Shot (4S), Five-Shot (5S) D. Nose Room and Head Room E. Eyelines: Narrow and Wide F. Height G. Tilting H. Booming I. Panning J. Breaking the frame: Entrances and Exits K. Deep Staging A. Size SBS pg. 122 Rev. 1/10 1 of 13
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DIRECTING FOR FILM 1 (FIL 2480) LECTURE & WORKSHOP 1 Professor: Lori Ingle lingle@mail.ucf.edu B. Over-the-shoulder 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The two images below give more emphasis to the foreground element. The left image keeps the foreground element off center and in slightly less focus. Therefore, the attention of the framing is still the background element. In the image on the right, the foreground element is center and in focus, with the background elements out of focus. This moves the viewer’s attention to the foreground element. 6. 7. C. Two-Shot (2S), Three-Shot (3S), Four-Shot (4S), Five-Shot (5S) 1. 2. 3. 2S 2S 3S 4. 5. 6. 3S 3S 3S 7. 8. 9. 4S 5S 5S Rev. 1/10 2 of 13
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DIRECTING FOR FILM 1 (FIL 2480) LECTURE & WORKSHOP 1 Professor: Lori Ingle lingle@mail.ucf.edu D. Nose Room and Head Room Nose Room is the negative space between an element’s implied line of attention and the edge of the frame or the area of emphasis beyond the edge of the frame. Head Room is the negative space above the top of the element and the top edge of the frame. In addition to the previous film frames as examples, the following images offer a range of specific points that can be made about Head Room and Nose room. Details offered in lecture. Keep Notes. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Rev. 1/10 3 of 13
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DIRECTING FOR FILM 1 (FIL 2480) LECTURE & WORKSHOP 1 Professor: Lori Ingle lingle@mail.ucf.edu E. Eyelines: Narrow and Wide Eyeline is the lateral placement of the camera relative to the eyes or vanishing point. Usually, placing the camera between 5 degrees and 33 degrees off axis from the eyes is comfortable for the audience and creates the strongest empathetic identification. In coverage, matched eyelines between characters enables the camera to disappear for the audience. The closer the camera is to the eyes, the narrower the eyeline. Becoming a Buddy: The actor looks straight into the camera. Breaks the 4 th wall. Increasing Empathy: The actor looks 33 – 5 degrees from the camera.
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2011 for the course FIL 2480 taught by Professor Ingle during the Fall '10 term at University of Central Florida.

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DIR1 S10 Wkshp 1 - DIRECTING FOR FILM 1 (FIL 2480) LECTURE...

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