Cooper%2C+Eagleman+_+Laucella+_2009_+March_Madness_and_Gender

Cooper%2C+Eagleman+_+Laucella+_2009_+March_Madness_and_Gender

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Unformatted text preview: 299 Journal of Intercollegiate Sport, 2009,2,299-311 2009HumanKinetics,Inc. Cooper is with the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Exercise and Sport Sciences (Sport Administration), Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Eagleman is with Indiana University, Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Bloomington, Indiana. Laucella is with Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Sport Journalism, Indianapolis, Indiana. NCAA March Madness: An Investigation of Gender Coverage in USA Today During the NCAA Basketball Tournaments Coyte G. Cooper UniversityofNorthCarolina,ChapelHill Andrea Eagleman IndianaUniversity Pamela C. Laucella IndianaUniversity-PurdueUniversityIndianapolis In todays economic environment, the United States newspaper industry has real- ized a severe period of decline in terms of circulation and overall consumer inter- est (Sullivan-Getty, 2009). While several major newspapers ceased existence in 2008, the USA Today remained the most popular American newspaper with a daily circulation well over 2.2 million (Sutel, 2008). However, with recent changes in consumer travel, the newspaper is expected to lose its position as the top U.S. daily following a 17% drop in circulation from April to September (Vanacore, 2009). With this in mind, it is critical that the USA Today identifies business strategies that will allow it to increase its circulation in years to come. In particular, it is more important than ever that the newspaper is aware of the content being delivered to consumers to ensure that it is delivering a highly competitive product. Thus, the purpose of the study is to investigate the coverage during the mens and womens NCAA Basketball Championships to determine whether the newspaper is provid- ing content to maximize its potential reach with sport consumers. The examination of past NCAA Basketball Championship media coverage, both mens and womens, has shown that the mens tournament garners far more media coverage than the womens tournament (Billings, Halone, & Denham, 2002; Blinde, Greendorfer, & Sankner; 1991; Hallmark & Armstrong, 1999; Messner, Duncan, and Jensen, 1993; Messner, Duncan, & Jensen, 1996). While several stud- ies have examined the coverage from an equity standpoint (NCAA participation), 300 Cooperetal. there has been no research to date that has examined the USA Today NCAA Bas- ketball Championship coverage from a consumption standpoint (NCAA attendance and revenues). Thus, the current study is unique because it allows researchers to determine whether the amount of coverage afforded to mens and womens teams is statistically significant when in direct comparison with consumption and equity standpoints....
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Cooper%2C+Eagleman+_+Laucella+_2009_+March_Madness_and_Gender

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