Phil-Final - Rolando Hernandez 04/26/10 Phil: Ethics 201...

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Rolando Hernandez 04/26/10 Phil: Ethics 201 Prof. Sosa Emmanuel Kant’s moral standpoint infers that euthanasia and physician assisted suicide are not morally permissible because they undermine an individual’s right to life. According to Kant, the source of moral obligation is derived from an individual’s practical reasoning to choose duty over impulse. Since euthanasia and physician assisted suicide can be considered acts of impulse due to desperation or avoidance of pain (on the patient’s behalf) and sympathy (on the physician’s part), they are not consistent with a person’s moral obligation. Thus, they should not be practiced because they violate the fundamental standards of moral obligation put forth by Kant. Instead, a physician should try his to perform his active duty of saving the patient’s life and a patient should strive to live under any circumstance. Therefore, they violate the standards of moral obligation put forth by Kant. The concept of fulfilling a duty, or doing do the “right thing”, is fairly relative in most situations considering that every individuals withholds a unique opinion on what doing the right thing entails. In most cases one can use his/her practical reasoning to determine what the right to do would be, but there are certain circumstances where the
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Phil-Final - Rolando Hernandez 04/26/10 Phil: Ethics 201...

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