Chen_Ravallion[1]

Chen_Ravallion[1] - Public Disclosure Authorized P olicy R...

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P O L I C Y R E S E A R C H W O R K I N G P A P E R 4703 The Developing World Is Poorer Than We Thought, But No Less Successful in the Fight against Poverty Shaohua Chen Martin Ravallion The World Bank Development Research Group August 2008 WPS4703 Public Disclosure Authorized
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Produced by the Research Support Team Abstract The Policy Research Working Paper Series disseminates the findings of work in progress to encourage the exchange of ideas about development issues. An objective of the series is to get the findings out quickly, even if the presentations are less than fully polished. The papers carry the names of the authors and should be cited accordingly. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank and its affiliated organizations, or those of the Executive Directors of the World Bank or the governments they represent. P O L I C Y R E S E A R C H W O R K I N G P A P E R 4703 The paper presents a major overhaul to the World Bank’s past estimates of global poverty, incorporating new and better data. Extreme poverty—as judged by what “poverty” means in the world’s poorest countries—is found to be more pervasive than we thought. Yet the data also provide robust evidence of continually declining poverty incidence and depth since the early 1980s. For 2005 we estimate that 1.4 billion people, or one quarter of the population of the developing world, lived below This paper—a product of the Development Research Group—is part of a larger effort in the department to monitor the developing world's progress against absolute poverty. Policy Research Working Papers are also posted on the Web at http:// econ.worldbank.org. The authors may be contacted at schen@worldbank.org or mravallion@worldbank.org. our international line of $1.25 a day in 2005 prices; 25 years earlier there were 1.9 billion poor, or one half of the population. Progress was uneven across regions. The poverty rate in East Asia fell from 80% to under 20 percent over this period. By contrast it stayed at around 50 percent in Sub-Saharan Africa, though with signs of progress since the mid 1990s. Because of lags in survey data availability, these estimates do not yet reflect the sharp rise in food prices since 2005.
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The developing world is poorer than we thought, but no less successful in the fight against poverty Shaohua Chen and Martin Ravallion 1 Development Research Group, World Bank 1818 H Street NW, Washington DC, 20433, USA Keywords: Global poverty, purchasing power parity JEL classifications: I32, E31, O10 1 A great many colleagues at the World Bank have helped us in obtaining the necessary data for this paper and answered our many questions. An important acknowledgement goes to the staff of over 100 governmental statistics offices who collected the primary household and price survey data. Our
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2011 for the course ENVS 450 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at S.F. State.

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Chen_Ravallion[1] - Public Disclosure Authorized P olicy R...

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