Phys205A_Lecture5

Physics for Scientists & Engineers with Modern Physics (4th Edition)

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Lecture 5 Chapter 2 Freely Falling Objects
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Kinematic Equations – summary
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Galileo Galilei z 1564 – 1642 z Italian physicist and astronomer z Developed the methodology of science z Supported heliocentric universe z Formulated laws of motion for objects in free fall
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Freely Falling Objects z A freely falling object is any object moving freely under the influence of gravity alone. z It does not depend upon the initial motion of the object z Dropped – released from rest z Thrown downward z Thrown upward
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Acceleration of Freely Falling Object z The acceleration of an object in free fall is directed downward, regardless of the initial motion z The magnitude of free fall acceleration is g = 9.80 m/s 2 z g decreases with increasing altitude z g varies with latitude (two reasons) z 9.80 m/s 2 is the average at the Earth’s surface z The italicized g will be used for the acceleration due to gravity z Not to be confused with g for grams
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Acceleration of Free Fall, cont. z
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This document was uploaded on 09/27/2011.

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Phys205A_Lecture5 - Lecture 5 Chapter 2 Freely Falling...

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