Phys205A_Lecture8

Physics for Scientists & Engineers with Modern Physics (4th Edition)

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Chapter 4 Motion in Two Dimensions Continue Projectile Motion LECTURE 8
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Examples of 2D motion: Projectile Motion Circular motion
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Assumptions of Projectile Motion z The free-fall acceleration is constant over the range of motion z It is directed downward z This is the same as assuming a flat Earth over the range of the motion z It is reasonable as long as the range is small compared to the radius of the Earth z The effect of air friction is negligible z With these assumptions, an object in projectile motion will follow a parabolic path z This path is called the trajectory
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Projectile Motion Diagram 2 1 2 fi i tt =+ + rr v g r r
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Analyzing Projectile Motion z Consider the motion as the superposition of the motions in the x - and y -directions z The actual position at any time is given by: z The initial velocity can be expressed in terms of its components z v xi = v i cos θ and v yi = v i sin z The x -direction has constant velocity z a x = 0 z The y-direction is free fall z a y = - g 2 1 2 fi i tt =+ + rr v g r r X-and Y motions are completely independent but have t as the common variable
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Phys205A_Lecture8 - LECTURE 8 Chapter 4 Motion in Two...

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