Grammar Ideas - Grammar Ideas 9/29/11 Ryan Thorpe Master...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 9/29/11 Grammar Ideas Ryan Thorpe
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9/29/11 1. Missing comma after an introductory element Readers usually need a small pause between an introductory word, phrase , or clause and the main part of the sentence, a pause most often signaled by a comma. Try to get into the habit of using
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9/29/11 2. Vague pronoun reference Does they refer to the signals or the airwaves? The editing clarifies what is being limited.
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9/29/11 3. Missing comma in a compound sentence A compound sentence consists of two or more parts that could each stand alone as a sentence. When the parts are joined by a coordinating conjunction - and, but, so, yet, or, nor, or for - use a comma before
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9/29/11 4. Missing comma(s) with a nonrestrictive element The reader does not need the clause who was the president of the club to know the basic meaning of the sentence: Marina was first to speak.
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8. Comma splice A comma splice occurs when only a comma separates clauses that could each
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2011 for the course ENGL 1113 taught by Professor Brown during the Fall '08 term at Oklahoma State.

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Grammar Ideas - Grammar Ideas 9/29/11 Ryan Thorpe Master...

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