WT 4e, chap 08-Memory-chg

WT 4e, chap 08-Memory-chg - chapter 8 Memory chapter 8...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Memory chapter 8
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Overview Reconstructing the past The power of suggestion In pursuit of memory Three-box model of memory How we remember Why we forget Autobiographical memories chapter 8
Background image of page 2
The manufacture of memory Memory is the capacity to retain and retrieve information. Memory is a reconstructive process. Source misattribution The inability to distinguish what you originally experienced from what you heard or were told later about an event chapter 8
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The fading flashbulb Some unusual, shocking, or tragic events hold a special place in memory. Called flashbulb memories because of their surprise, illumination, and photographic detail Even flashbulb memories have errors. chapter 8
Background image of page 4
Conditions of confabulation Confabulation Confusion of an event that happened to someone else with one that happened to you, or. . . A belief that you remember something when it never actually happened Confabulation is most likely when. . . you have thought or heard about the event many times. the image of the event contains many details. the event is easy to imagine. chapter 8
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The eyewitness on trial Eyewitnesses are not always reliable Factors influencing accuracy Cross race identification Question wording (e.g., “crashed” vs “hit”) Misleading information chapter 8
Background image of page 6
Children’s testimony Under what conditions are children more suggestible? When they are very young When interviewers’ expectations are clear When other children’s memories for events are accessible chapter 8
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Children’s testimony When asked if a visitor committed acts that had not occurred, few 4–6 year olds said yes. 100% of 3-year olds said yes. When investigators used techniques taken from real child-abuse investigations, most children said yes. chapter 8
Background image of page 8
Explicit memory Conscious, intentional recollection of an event or item of information. Recall: The ability to retrieve and reproduce from memory previously learned material Recognition: The ability to identify previously encountered material chapter 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Unconscious retention in memory, as evidenced by the effect of a previous experience or previously encountered information on current thoughts or actions. chapter 8
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/28/2011 for the course PSYC 101 taught by Professor Cusaac during the Fall '08 term at South Carolina.

Page1 / 41

WT 4e, chap 08-Memory-chg - chapter 8 Memory chapter 8...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online