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Woods2E_PP_chapter01Revised[1]

Woods2E_PP_chapter01Revised[1] - CHAPTER 1 What Is Sport...

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Chapter 1 What is Sport and Why Do We Study It? 1 What Is Sport and Why Do What Is Sport and Why Do We Study It? We Study It? C H A P T E R
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Sport Is A Microcosm Of Society Our sports are organized similar to our society and vice versa.
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Why Study Sport? Sport is an integral part of everyday life. It builds connections with strangers and communities. It provides identities for cities and schools. It provides role models in our society. It affects our culture, traditions, and values.
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Varda Burstyn The feelings and identification engendered by sport “approximate the experience of religion more than any other form of human cultural practice.”
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Sport Through the Ages Early Greeks used sport for celebrating, hunting, and honoring the gods. Spartans used sport to improve war skills. Athenians used sport, along with academics and music, to develop a person holistically.
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Discussion What is the difference between play, games, sport, and work?
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Figure 1.1
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Play Free activity to explore environment, express oneself, dream, and pretend No firm rules No set location Outcome unimportant Pleasure only objective Name some examples
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Games Specialized form of play with more structure Mental or physical (inactive or active) Informal or formal rules Competitive Outcome is prestige or status Name some examples
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Discussion
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