Chapter 5 [Autosaved] - Neurosensory Organization of Speech...

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Neurosensory Organization of Speech and Hearing Chapter 5
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The importance of sensory feedback control in motor acts was overlooked previously Audition plays a special and primary feedback role in the control of speech
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Sherrington’s Scheme Classification of sensation – has applications to speech Divided the sensory receptors into 3 broad classes Exteroceptors – medicate sight sound, smell, and cutaneous sensation Proprioceptors – mediate deep somatic sensation from receptors beneath the skin, in muscles and joints, and in the inner ear (pressure, movement, vibration, position, deep pain, equilibrium) Interoceptors – mediate sensation from the viscera, as well as visceral pain and pressure
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Anatomy of Sensation Neuroanatomy of the senses is complex The somatic sensory pathways – those dealing with bodily sensation – use the spinal cord and spinal nerves Sensation to the head and vocal mechanism – the larynx, pharynx, soft palate, tongue – use the cranial nerves
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Agnosias Sensory disorders resulting in an inability to interpret a sensory stimulus and recognize it Caused by damage to cortical sensory association areas or pathways
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Agnosias Visual Agnosia – inability to recognize objects, colors, and pictures Auditory Agnosia – inability to comprehend speech or nonspeech sounds (pure forms: auditory nonverbal agnosia and pure word deafness Tactile Syndrome – inability to recognize objects by touch; characterized by bilateral parietal lobe lesions
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Chapter 5 [Autosaved] - Neurosensory Organization of Speech...

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