Assisted Suicide - Assisted Suicide LaShaundra Jenkins PHI:...

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Assisted Suicide LaShaundra Jenkins PHI: 200 Erin Schouten September 19, 2011
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In today society, one of the most controversial issues is physician-assisted suicide for the terminally ill. Some people feel that it is wrong for people regardless of their health condition, to ask their health care provider to end their life; while others feel it is their right to be able to choose how and when they die. When a physician is asked to help a patient into death, they have many responsibilities that come along with that single question. Among those responsibilities are: providing valid information as to the terminal illness the patient is suffering, educating the patient as to what their final options may be, making the decision of whether or not to help the patient into death, and also if they do decide to help, providing the lethal dose of medication that will end the patient's life. For those who believe in physician-assisted suicide should be their choice, they feel it should be legalized because: they don't want to go through the suffering caused by the terminal illness; they fear the loss of their independence; becoming a burden to their family or friends, and also the fear of dying alone. One the other hand those opposed to assisted suicide feel it goes against religious beliefs and medical ethics. They also believe that there is always the possibility that a miracle will occur and the patient will overcome the illness and also that the doctor could have provided the wrong prognosis/diagnosis to the patient. The strongest reason against physician-assisted suicide has been the idea that if assisted suicide becomes legal, it will get out of hand and target certain people in society, such as those with disabilities, or certain races. "Our attitudes toward the elderly, people with disabilities and the devaluation of individuals for the higher good of society' should be reflected upon". The issue of pain being a part of the reason for people choosing assisted suicide is also argued against. One source says that, "Pain is controllable. Modern medicine has the ability to control pain. A person who seeks to kill him or herself to avoid pain does not need legalized assisted suicide but a doctor better trained in alleviating pain" (Key Points for Debating Assisted Suicide 1, hereafter known as Key Points).
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What are key disputes in the controversy over euthanasia? Advocates of active euthanasia typically argue that killing the patients in question is not worse than letting them die. Advocates of voluntary euthanasia often claim that patients should have the right to do what they want with their own lives. Advocates of mercy killing argue that for patients who are in vegetative states with no prospect of recovery, letting them die prevents future needless and futile treatment efforts. If they are suffering then killing them prevents further suffering. Advocates of physician-assisted suicide argue that a physician assisting a terminally ill or suffering patient is merely helping the patient who wishes to die with dignity. Critics of the euthanasia typically argue that killing is always wrong, that non-voluntary or
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Assisted Suicide - Assisted Suicide LaShaundra Jenkins PHI:...

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