Final Exam Notes

Final Exam Notes - Tim Joo 4/7 Identifications (10 Points...

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Tim Joo 4/7 Identifications (10 Points Each) 2/3 Essays (30 Points Each) Wednesday December 22, 2010 New Testament FINAL EXAM |----------|-----------|----------|----------|----------|----------|----------|----------|----------|------- 0 Babylonian Exile (586-538/537 bce) Rededication of 2 nd Temple (516 bce) Maccabean Revolt (167 bce) Roman Rule of Judea [Start Date] (63 bce) Jewish War and Destruction of the 2 nd Temple (66-70 ce) Paul’s Letters (50-60 ce)? Mark (65 or 70 ce)? Matthew (80 or 85 ce)? Luke-Acts (80 or 85 ce)? John (95 ce) Revelation (95 ce)? Hebrews (64 ce) Mary of Magdala (120-180 ce)? Council of Nicea (325 ce) Identifications: Major Texts : - Letters of Paul – Paul wrote many of the books in the New Testament canon around the time of 50-60ce. He was a scholar and an apocalypticist so most of his letters have an apocalyptic point of view, where he focuses on the Judgment Day and Jesus coming again. He emphasized Jesus’ return and that the end is near. He wrote 1 Thessalonians with his followers, Timothy and Silvanus. 1 Thessalonians is largely agreed by scholars to be the oldest book in the New Testament. In 1 Corinthians, his authority is demonstrated in the tone of his letter and his wisdom. - Mark: o Messianic Secret (Mark, see class handout and Ehrman)- Jesus told his disciples not to reveal him as the Messiah. Jesus spoke in parables as secret messages for the chosen people to understand. People may listen, but not understand. Jesus was portrayed as strange
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Tim Joo 4/7 Identifications (10 Points Each) 2/3 Essays (30 Points Each) Wednesday December 22, 2010 New Testament FINAL EXAM and mysterious. Jesus’ early life, about birth and family, are unclear because he sort of just appears in Mark and begins from the point he was baptized. When Jesus rose from the dead, he chose to only reveal himself to only one person (Mary Magdalene) instead of everyone. - Matthew : o Women in Matthew’s genealogy (see Ehrman 8.2) Matthew includes five women in his genealogy: Mary, Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and Bathsheba, the “wife of Uriah.” This is interesting because women hardly ever appear in other ancient Jewish genealogies, yet Matthew decided to have five in his. There are two favored theories by scholars to explain why these five women were included in Matthew’s genealogy. One theory says that four of the women were all Gentiles (not Israelites), but there is still confusion as to how they are connected to Mary (a Jew). Another theory proposes that four of the women were involved with “scandalous” sexual activities that furthered the purposes of God. Tamar tricked her father-in-law into having sex with her by disguising herself as a prostitute; Bathsheba committed adultery with David, who arranged to have her husband killed; and Rahab was a prostitute who lived in Jericho (who became the mother-in- law of Ruth). Mary was thought to have engaged in illicit sexual
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Final Exam Notes - Tim Joo 4/7 Identifications (10 Points...

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