Motion2 - S olomon’s Study Notes College Physics 1 Mechanics& Heat Fall 2011 Solomon Weiskop PhD Motion(2 These Notes cover Motion in 2D(and

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Unformatted text preview: S olomon’s Study Notes College Physics 1 Mechanics & Heat Fall 2011 Solomon Weiskop PhD [ Motion (2) ] These Notes cover Motion in 2D (and also some more complicated cases of Motion in 1D). Study Notes are available to print out by registering at www.solomonlinetutor.com Solomon Weiskop PhD Solomon’s Tutoring © Copyright 2011 1 1. Two-Dimensional Motion Up to now, we’ve limited ourselves to problems involving motion in just x or in just y but not both (that is, one-dimensional motion 1D). Let’s now consider two-dimensional motion 2D (i.e. both x and y). As was already pointed out in Motion (1) , many physical quantities of interest in the study of motion (Position, Displacement, Velocity, Acceleration) are vectors. In one-dimensional motion we only had to consider a single component of these vectors (either x- or y-comps). In two-dimensional motion we must consider both x- and y-comps together. This means that the vector nature of these physical quantities will become more prominent. For example, ¡ ¢ ££¡ ¤ ¥ are the components of the velocity vector ¡ ¦ . From them, we can get magnitude ∗ and direction §¡£¨ © ª of the velocity vector in the general way previously given in Vectors : « ¬ ­« ® ¯ ° « ± ¯ ² « ¬ ³´µ ¶· « ® « ± ¸ ¥ The same holds true for the other vector physical quantities as well. If you need to go the other way i.e. get the x- and y-comps from magnitude and direction, you proceed as was done in Ex.1 of Vectors . To solve a two-dimensional CAM problem, you follow the General Strategy outlined in Motion (1) except you now need two shopping lists (one for the x motion and one for the y motion). Typically, even “simple” CAM problems in 2D will require more than one step. An important type of two-dimensional motion is projectile motion, which we will discuss next. ∗ The magnitude of the velocity vector has a special name. It is called: speed. 2 2. Projectile Motion A n object in free fall is sometimes called a “projectile”. Previously in Motion (1) we only considered projectiles in 1D i.e. moving strictly vertically. We will now consider “projectile motion” problems involving both vertical and horizontal motion. In such cases, you treat the horizontal and vertical motions separately, following the General CAM Procedure for both. You will need two shopping lists (one for the x motion and one for the y motion). Below I illustrate a fairly typical projectile motion problem: I’ve followed the general CAM procedure: I’ve made a sketch including axes. I’ve indicated on my sketch which points I’ve chosen as “initial” and “final”. I’ve also made two shopping lists and have included on them (written in green ) the details that would be common to any projectile motion problem....
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This note was uploaded on 09/27/2011 for the course PHY 121 taught by Professor Stephens during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Motion2 - S olomon’s Study Notes College Physics 1 Mechanics& Heat Fall 2011 Solomon Weiskop PhD Motion(2 These Notes cover Motion in 2D(and

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