350lect16 - 16 Reflection and transmission, TE mode Last...

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Unformatted text preview: 16 Reflection and transmission, TE mode Last lecture we learned how to represent plane-TEM waves propagating in a direction k in terms of field phasors In 1808 Etienne-Loius Malus discovered that light re- flected from a surface at an oblique angle will in general be polarized differently than the incident wave on the re- flecting surface. This is caused by the differ- ence of the reflection coeffi- cients of TE and TM com- ponents of the incident wave as we will learn in this lec- ture. Practical implementa- tion of the phenomenon in- clude polarizers and polariz- ing filters used in optical in- struments, photography, and LCD displays. E = E o e- j k r and H = k E such that = , k = k k, and k = . Such waves are only permitted in homogeneous propagation media with constant and and zero . The condition of zero can be relaxed easily in that case the above relations would still hold if we were to replace by + j as we will see later on. In this lecture we will examine the propagation of plane-TEM waves across two distinct homogeneous media having a planar interface be- tween them. k i k r k t 2 1 x z H i k 1 cos 1 k 1 sin 1 k 2 sin 2 Medium 1 Medium 2 1 With no loss of generality we can choose unit vector x be the unit- normal of the interface plane separating medium 1 in the region x < from medium 2 in the region x > . 1 A plane-TEM wave incident onto the interface from medium 1 is as- signed a wavevector k i = k 1 ( x cos 1 + z sin 1 ) by taking y to be orthogonal to k i (see margin)....
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350lect16 - 16 Reflection and transmission, TE mode Last...

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