Lecture_11_2_26_08 -...

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Psych325/HD370 Introduction to Adult Psychopathology
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The Brain,  Neurons and Neurotransmitter, Mood Adult Psychopathology Lecture 11 2/26/08
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Today’s Lecture  1. From the brain stem to the cortex 2. Bridging the synapse 3.  Neurotransmitter highways
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Prelim I Tonight       7-9:30 p.m. Uris Auditorium  
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 How drugs enter the body  1. Kinds of Drugs 2. By mouth, injection, breathing …
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1.2 Routes of drug administration
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1.1 Pharmacokinetic factors that determine bioavailability of drugs
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 How drugs enter the body  1. Kinds of Drugs 2. By mouth, injection, breathing … 3. Crossing the blood brain barrier… Oh, those  wonderful lipid-soluble drugs
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1.6 Distribution of cerebrospinal fluid (Part 1)
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Now … for, our purposes, the most important factor: crossing the blood brain barrier 1. Depends on lipid-soluble drugs (lipids are fatty molecules that can pass through cell membranes) 2. Everyone’s brain barrier is slightly different, making it difficult to know the dosage of, say, an antidepressant drug, for any given person
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 How drugs enter the body  1. Kinds of Drugs 2. By mouth, injection, breathing … 3. Crossing the blood brain barrier…  4. Oh, those lipid-soluble drugs! 5. Switching on a neuron
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Now, once the drug has reached the brain,  how do they work on individual neurons? Answer: receptors take in the drug, which  either affects the neuron directly (by  making it “fire”) or by turning on genes  which, in turn, produce proteins,  changing the functioning of that neuron
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1.10 Two principal types of receptors
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And now to Chapter 2 First: what they look like
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2.2 Principal parts of neurons
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2.1 Varied shapes of neurons (Part 1)
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2.1 Varied shapes of neurons (Part 2)
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2.3 Dendritic trees with spines
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And now to Chapter 2 First: what they look like Second: how they’re built
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How They’re Built 1. Fluid inside (cytoplasm) and out (extracelluar fluid) 2. Generating energy with adosine triphosphate (ATP) 3. Myelin coating made by glial cells – the thicker the coating, the faster the conduction of electrical signals 4. Chromosomes inside – long strands of DNA.
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1. Neurons either change the polarity of other  neurons by flooding them with ions until they  fire … or 2. They send neurotransmitters into the synapses  between the neurons. These neurotransmitters  “switch on” genes in the other neurons, causing  them to produce proteins which essentially  change them, conveying information to  adjoining neurons. 3.
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This note was uploaded on 09/27/2011 for the course HD 370 taught by Professor Segal during the Spring '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Lecture_11_2_26_08 -...

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