Lecture_13_2008

Lecture_13_2008 - Psych325/...

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  Psych325/HD370 Introduction to Adult Psychopathology
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More on the biology of depression,  Bi-polar Disorder,  & Hamlet’s turning point,    Psych 325 Lecture 13 3/4/08
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Today’s Lecture  1. ECT & Deep Brain Stimulation 2.   Mania, hypomania, & bipolar variants 1. Treating Bi-Polarity … 2. Hamlet decides to take action (and God  save us all)
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Classic Model of Inherited Disease
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But if you think of depression as a disease … Then why don’t identical twins come down with major depression identically, that is, 100% of the time? Well, this brings us to the all-important concept: the Two-Hit Model
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The “Two Hit” Model
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The “Multi-Hit” Model
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Three Kinds of People 1. Those who don’t suffer from depression or dysthymia,  who have bad days, will grieve a loss, but don’t spiral  down into a major depressive episode. 2. Those who usually don’t suffer from depression but,  when stressed beyond a certain point, develop  depressive symptoms and benefit from a short-term use  of medication and therapy to come out of it. When the  stress or crisis resolves, they often taper off their meds  without a relapse. 3. Those who are chronically depressed without  medication. Psychotherapy may be helpful in that it  provides insight and ways to minimize stress, but these  people only experience substantial relief with  medication.
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16.14 Two monoamine pathways in the human brain (Part 2)
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16.14 Two monoamine pathways in the human brain (Part 1)
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Different Biological Explanations 1. At the level of the neuron …Either the neurons don’t produce enough seratonin which interferes with neural firing, or their dendrites are defective. 2. At a specific system in the brain, stress damages the HPA Axis 3. At a region of the brain, the limbic system may be responsible for depressed mood.
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16.15 Effect of stress and antidepressant treatment on BDNF in hippocampal cells
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How SSRI’s Work – Part 1
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How SSRI’s Work Part 2
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How SSRI’s Work Part 3
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How SSRI’s Work Part 4
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How SSRI’s Work – Part 5
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Current Models for Explaining Depression from Brain Functioning 1) The HPA – Hippocampus Hypothesis. Our normal response to stress includes activation of the hypothalamus, which initiates a cascade of events beginning with the release of CRF. CRF acts at the anterior pituitary to induce adrenocorticotropic hormone ACTH release. ACTH in turn causes the adrenal cortex to release cortisol
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