Lecture_20_4_3_08.ppt -...

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  Psych325/HD370 Introduction to Adult Psychopathology
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Anxiety , Anxiety Disorders, Psych 325 Lecture 20 4/3/08
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Today’s Lecture 1. What is anxiety? (A reprise from Thursday) 2. Anxiety Disorders 3. GABA & Benzoid Receptors
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Anxiety 1. The Role of Anxiety in Everyday Life 2. Anxiety as a Motivator 3.   Anxiety as an Inhibitor 1. 5.   Anxiety & Early Experience
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(Some of) The Defenses Against  Anxiety in Everyday Life        Magical Thinking     Obsessions     Compulsions     Perfectionism     Rumination     Dissociation     Drugs, Alcohol
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17.1 Three-component model of anxiety
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17.5 Occurrence of OCD symptoms (Part 1)
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17.5 Occurrence of OCD symptoms (Part 2)
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Generalized Anxiety Disorder Symptoms Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is much more than the normal anxiety people experience day to day.  It's chronic and exaggerated worry and tension, even though nothing seems to provoke it. Having this  disorder means always anticipating disaster, often worrying excessively about health, money, family, or  work. Sometimes, though, the source of the worry is hard to pinpoint. Simply the thought of getting  through the day provokes anxiety. People with GAD can't seem to shake their concerns, even though they usually realize that their anxiety is  more intense than the situation warrants. People with GAD also seem unable to relax. They often have  trouble falling or staying asleep. Their worries are accompanied by physical symptoms, especially  trembling, twitching, muscle tension, headaches, irritability, sweating, or hot flashes. They may feel  lightheaded or out of breath. They may feel nauseated or have to go to the bathroom frequently. Or they  might feel as though they have a lump in the throat.  Many individuals with GAD startle more easily than other people. They tend to feel tired, have trouble  concentrating, and sometimes suffer depression, too.  Usually the impairment associated with GAD is mild and people with the disorder don't feel too restricted in social settings or on the job. Unlike many other anxiety disorders, people with GAD don't  characteristically avoid certain situations as a result of their disorder. However, if severe, GAD can be  very debilitating, making it difficult to carry out even the most ordinary daily activities.  GAD comes on gradually and most often hits people in childhood or adolescence, but can begin in  adulthood, too. It's more common in women than in men and often occurs in relatives of affected persons.  It's diagnosed when someone spends at least 6 months worried excessively about a number of everyday  problems
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Lecture_20_4_3_08.ppt -...

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