Lecture_21_4_8_08 -...

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  Psych325/HD370 Introduction to Adult Psychopathology
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Anxiety Disorders, The Play Within the Play Psych 325 Lecture 21 4/8/08
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Today’s Lecture 1. The Anxiety Disorders 2. The Physiology of Anxiety 1. Psychotherapy for Anxiety 2. The Conscience of the King
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17.1 Three-component model of anxiety
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Anxiety Disorders Phobias Generalized Anxiety Disorder    Panic Attacks Panic Disorder Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia Social Anxiety Disorder Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Eating Disorders Anorexia, Bulimia Body Dysmorphic Disorder Post Traumatic Distress Disorder
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)  is an anxiety disorder that can develop after  exposure to a terrifying event or ordeal in which grave physical harm occurred or  was threatened. Traumatic events that may trigger PTSD include violent personal  assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat. Among those who may experience PTSD are military troops who served in the  Vietnam and Gulf Wars; rescue workers involved in the aftermath of disasters like  the terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C.; survivors of the  Oklahoma City bombing; survivors of accidents, rape, physical and sexual abuse,  and other crimes; immigrants fleeing violence in their countries; survivors of the  1994 California earthquake, the 1997 North and South Dakota floods, and  hurricanes Hugo and Andrew; and people who witness traumatic events. Family  members of victims also can develop the disorder. PTSD can occur in people of any  age, including  children and adolescents . Many people with PTSD repeatedly re-experience the ordeal in the form of  flashback episodes, memories, nightmares, or frightening thoughts, especially  when they are exposed to events or objects reminiscent of the trauma.  Anniversaries of the event can also trigger symptoms. People with PTSD also  experience emotional numbness and sleep disturbances,  depression anxiety , and  irritability or outbursts of anger. Feelings of intense guilt are also common. Most 
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