The predatory and alternative prey preference of Anisops spp.on mosquito larvae of Aedes polynesie

The predatory and alternative prey preference of Anisops spp.on mosquito larvae of Aedes polynesie

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The predatory and alternative prey preference of Anisops spp.on mosquito larvae of Aedes polynesiensis in artificial containers and tires. Prepared by: Faalolo’iTe’o Tafuna High School Grade 12 Science Symposium 2010 Abstract Backswimmers have been known to posses the predatory behavior on various prey species, including mosquito immatures. This study determines the efficacy of Anisops sp. found 1
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in American Samoa against mosquito larvae Ae. polynesiensis , which is the main vector of filariasis and dengue fever among the Pacific region. The present study utilized second instars, fourth instars and ostracods as an alternative prey for the Anisops spp. . Eight treatments, conducted under field conditions, in plastic ice cream containers and tires, were replicated four times. Result from each treatment was recorded after 24 hours. A factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of habitat, development stage of prey, and alternate prey on the predation of Ae. polynesiensis larvae by Anisops sp, and also to calculate their mean preferences with the presence of an alternate prey. If the results from the present study are successful, it can be an initial phase of considering these predators as effective predators in mosquito breeding locations. Introduction The global prevalence of dengue fever has increased in recent year’s tobecome a major public concern, especially in Southeast Asia, Latin America and the Western and South Pacific. Aedes polynesiensis, the Polynesian tiger mosquito, which is found only in the South Pacific, is a vector of dengue fever, and a vector of the parasite that causes lymphatic filariasis (Danivito, 2007). The World Health Organization estimated that there are 50 million dengue cases that occur worldwide every year; and 2.5 billion people, two fifths of the world’s population, are at 2
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risk of getting this virus (WHO, 2008). Dengue has spread throughout the Pacific countries. The six most affected Pacific island countries and territories most recently were French Polynesia (35,869 cases), New Caledonia (6,836 cases), Cook Islands (3,735 cases), American Samoa (1,816 cases), Palau (1,108 cases), and the Federated States of Micronesia (664 cases) (World Health Organization 2009). In American Samoa dengue fever epidemics are becoming more frequent. From December 2009 to August 2010, there have been 319 confirmed cases of dengue fever in American Samoa (American Samoa Department of Health, 2010). Lymphatic filariasis is endemic in the Samoan Islands . The Pacific Program for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (PacELF) was established with the goal to stop the transmission of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in 16 Pacific island countries and territories where filariasis is endemic and caused by the nematode Wucherariabancrofti (Cobbold) (Burkot and Ichimori, 2002; Burkot et al., 2002). In this region lymphatic filariasis is subperiodic and transmitted by Aedes species; the most important of these vectors is Ae. polynesiensis
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The predatory and alternative prey preference of Anisops spp.on mosquito larvae of Aedes polynesie

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