M1 - Abstract In this experiment, a plot of time Vs t/h-ho...

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Abstract In this experiment, a plot of time Vs t/h-ho was made to get the slope s and then use it to calculate the diffusion coefficient D AB experimentally. Also, D AB was calculated theoretically by using 2 empirical correlations. D AB was found for 4 different components. They are Acetone, Chloroform, n-Hexane and Methanol. The components were put in tubes where the liquid level was measured at a certain time interval. Values of D AB experimental and theoretical were compared and the % error was discussed. For example, experimental D AB for acetone was 0.101 cm 2 /s and the theoritical one was 0.07 cm 2 /s and the error was 43.7%. Finally, the report ends with a conclusion and recommendation. Introduction The diffusion coefficient for gases is affected by change of temperature and pressure and composition. Diffusion coefficient values of gases are much higher than in liquids and solids. The diffusivity of gases can be measured using evaporation tubes and that was done in this experiment. The simple theory of diffusion coefficient method involves the usual assumption of constant pressure and temperature, constant diffusion coefficient, one-dimensional diffusion, axial symmetry and absence of convection effects. In addition, gas is assumed insoluble; hence the gas in the tube is stagnant. Finally steady state condition. So that, the concentration gradient between the liquid level and the top of the tube are constant. Theoretical Background
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M1 - Abstract In this experiment, a plot of time Vs t/h-ho...

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