lecture_2 - Measurement in Physics Rob Clark PHY 302K UT...

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Measurement in Physics Rob Clark PHY 302K UT Austin Lecture #2
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Outline The metric system Building blocks of matter Derived physical quantities Unit conversions Estimation Math review
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The SI system Physics is a quantitative science. And to measure anything, you need a system of units. Scientists worldwide have agreed upon a standard system of units, the Systeme Internationale (or SI). The base units of length, time, and mass are what we will use most in this class. These are identical to "metric" units. Other units are built up from these units.
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The unit of length The meter (m) is the SI unit of length. Originally, it was defined to be 1/10 000 000 the distance from the North pole to the equator. This is a handy way to remember the circumfrence of the earth! This distance is hard to measure precisely, though. Therefore, a meter is defined in terms of the standard of time, and the speed of light. 1 m is the distance light travels, in vacuum, in 1/299 792 458 of
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lecture_2 - Measurement in Physics Rob Clark PHY 302K UT...

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