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HadrianToCommodus - Inthislecture,...

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In this lecture, we will be looking at art and architecture associated with the emperors Hadrian, Marcus Aurelius, and Commodus We’ll be spending the most time on Hadrian and the monuments associated with him, and in a moment I’ll go into detail about Hadrian’s life and rule. At the moment, however, I simply want to make you aware of the locations of the monuments that we will discuss in this lecture. Most of the works of art and architecture that we’ll see are located in Rome , and we’ll look at a map on the next slide to give you an idea of locations within the i (*) ’ll l b l ki d i ill i i li j h f (*) city (*). We’ll also be looking at Hadrian’s villa in Tivoli , just northeast of Rome (*), and at Hadrian’s Wall , a huge defensive wall that the emperor ordered to be built in northern Britain. 1
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Here we have a portrait of the emperor Hadrian and a map of Rome. I want to start with the map of Rome and point out the locations of the monuments that we’ll see in this lecture. We’re going to start with the Pantheon, a point out the locations of the monuments that we ll see in this lecture. We re going to start with famous temple built by Hadrian. We’ll also be looking at some relief sculptures associated with Hadrian were reinstalled on the triumphal arch of a much later emperor, Constantine (*). Here’s the arch of Constantine —it is very close to the Colosseum in Rome (*). We’ll also look at the Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius, which was originally erected somewhere in the city of Rome. In the 16 th century, Michelangelo placed the statue at the center of the Piazza del Campidoglio on the Capitoline Hill in Rome —it was part of a major building campaign undertaken by Michelangelo. Since 1981, a replica has been displayed in the Piazza, and the original, now restored, is on display in the Capitoline Museum (*). Now I would like you to concentrate your attention on the portrait of Hadrian on the left side of this slide. Hadrian was the successor to Trajan and ruled between 117 and 138 CE Hadrian was educated in Athens Hadrian was the successor to Trajan, and ruled between 117 and 138 CE. Hadrian was educated in Athens, Greece, and was responsible for endowing several buildings in that city, including a library. Hadrian’s time in Greece is probably the reason that the works of art and architecture associated with him are strongly classical in nature. We’ll see this particularly in his villa in Tivoli, which he had decorated with numerous copies of Classical Greek masterpieces. He also named many of the parts of his villa after locations in Athens and other parts of the Greek world. Hadrian’s taste for classical Greek art wasn’t new: many wealthy Romans decorated their homes and gardens with copies of Greek sculpture. But with Hadrian, we see this being done on an extremely large scale.
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