Chapter 14 Classical Art

Chapter 14 - Chapter 14 Classical Art Greece and Rome First read and focus Read Chapter 14 Classical Art Greece and Rome Look at the differences

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Chapter 14 Classical Art: Greece and Rome First : read and focus Read Chapter 14, Classical Art: Greece and Rome. Look at the differences and likenesses between the Greek, Etruscan, and Roman and did they borrow for artistic styles or ideas of others? Focus on the principal movements in art and their unique characteristics. Second : review and extra help Visit these sites for Chapter 14. They were recommended by your book Understanding Art. Perseus Project at Tufts at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/ and http://art.wadsworth.com/fichner7/ Third : vocabulary and terminology Vocabulary and terminology from Chapter 14 to know for the final test. Hellenism o The culture, thought, and ethical system of ancient Greece Classical Art o Art of the Greek classical period, spanning roughly 480-400 BCE; also known as Hellenic art Humanism o A system of belief in which human kind is viewed as the standard by which all things are measured Rationalism o The belief that ethical conduct is determined by reason; in philosophy, the theory that knowledge is derived from the intellect, without the aid of the senses Naturalism o Representation that strives to imitate nature rather than to express intellectual theory Idealism o The representation of forms according to the concept of perfection Geometric period o A period of Greek art from about 900 to 700 BCE during which works of art emphasized geometric patterns Archaic period o A period of Greek art dating roughly 660-480 BCE. The term archaic means “old” and refers to the art created before the classical period
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Volute krater o A wide-mouthed vessel with scroll shaped handles Black-figure painting technique o A three-stage firing process that gives vases black figures on a reddish ground. In the first, oxidizing phase of firing, oxygen is the kiln turns the vase and slip red. In the second, reducing phase, oxygen is eliminated form the kiln and the vase and slip turn black. In the third, reoxidizing phase, oxygen is reintroduced into the kiln, turning the case red once more Megaron o A rectangular room with two columned porch Cella o The small inner room of a Greek temple, used to house the statue of the god or goddess to whom the temple is dedicated. Located behind solid masonry walls, the cella was accessible only to the temple priests Doric Order o The earliest and simplest of the Greek architectural styles, consisting of relatively short, squat columns, sometimes unfluted, and a simple, square-shaped capital the Doric frieze is usually divided into triglyphs and metopes Ionic Order o A moderately ornate Greek architectural style introduced from Asia Minor and characterized by spiral scrolls (volutes) on capitals and a continuous frieze Corinthian Order o The most ornate of the Greek architectural styles, characterized by slender, fluted columns and capitals with an acanthus leaf design Stylobate o A continuous base or platform that supports a row of columns
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2011 for the course ART 1301 taught by Professor Brockman during the Summer '08 term at Blinn College.

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Chapter 14 - Chapter 14 Classical Art Greece and Rome First read and focus Read Chapter 14 Classical Art Greece and Rome Look at the differences

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