Fall2011IntroductiontoCriminalJusticesec01.doc

Fall2011IntroductiontoCriminalJusticesec01.doc -...

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Introduction to Criminal Justice 01 202 201-01 Monday and Thursday 10:20 AM to 11:40 AM L ucy S tone Auditorium Robert T. Szejner, Ed. D. Visiting Professor Criminal Justice E-mail: Szejner@rci.rutgers.edu Secretary’s telephone: (848) 445-7218 Office: Stone Hall A-351, Livingston Campus Or by appointment Program in Criminal Justice Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey Learning Goals: A Statement of Principles The Program Committee for the Program in Criminal Justice at Rutgers University in New Brunswick has adopted a series of learning goals for students who complete the major. These goals represent the consensus of the faculty regarding the concepts a student should grasp and the skills a student should acquire in the course of completing the major. These goals guide the choices faculty make about the structure of the curriculum and the requirements for our majors. Moreover, they guide faculty and instructors preparing course material and teaching courses. The Program in Criminal Justice will provide students with a rich understanding of crime and criminal justice in the United States and abroad through an interdisciplinary approach that blends a strong liberal arts educational experience with pre-professional instruction in the field of criminal justice. Graduates of the program will be well-informed citizens on the topic of crime and justice, and qualified for graduate study or for employment as practitioners in a variety of legal, policymaking, and law enforcement fields. Criminal justice majors graduating from a research university should be able to use critical thinking, factual inquiry, and the scientific approach to solve problems related to individual and group behavior. In addition, students should have an understanding of the legal, political and policymaking processes that affect criminal justice systems in the United States and elsewhere in the world. Finally, students should be familiar with the institutional structures and latest developments in the field in order to engage in meaningful debate about current public policy issues. 1
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Learning Goals for Criminal Justice Majors 1. Competence: a.) Theory. Students who complete the major in criminal justice should understand and be able to articulate, both orally and in writing, the core theoretical concepts that form the foundation of analysis and research in criminology and criminal justice today. Core concepts are derived from explanations of crime from a variety of perspectives, including biogenic, psychological, and sociological approaches. There are myriad theories of crime that are informed by these perspectives, including, classical, control, critical, ecology, labeling, learning, strain, and trait-based approaches. Theoretical literacy should extend to multicultural and international
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2011 for the course CRIMINAL J 201 taught by Professor Scezjner during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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Fall2011IntroductiontoCriminalJusticesec01.doc -...

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