Mitigation Strategies and Solutions

Mitigation Strategies and Solutions - Mitigation Strategies...

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Mitigation Strategies and Solutions: Conserving Energy and Human Population 1 Mitigation Strategies and Solutions: Conserving Energy and Human Population Mitigation Strategies and Solutions: Conserving Energy and Human Population
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Mitigation Strategies and Solutions: Conserving Energy and Human Population 2 Developing countries with rapid population growth face the urgent need to improve their living standards without destroying the environment. Natural resources are facing a coupling of increased pressure, threatening the health of the public and our development. The global challenge begins with the water shortages, loss of forests, and air and water pollution. Are we blindly destroying our natural resources needed for our future, as we humans exploit nature to meet our present needs? The world’s current supply of energy is provided by natural resources. Natural resources are defined as various nonrenewable and renewable energy sources. A renewable resource consists of naturally occurring resources in nature, like wind (windpower), water (hydropower), or sun (solar). Renewable energy is safer for the environment when compared to nonrenewable resources. Only about 9 percent of electricity in the U.S. is generated from these renewable sources (EPA, 1997). Renewable resources are replaced in nature as they are used, which makes this type of energy highly desirable. Nonrenewable resources are found in fixed amounts, these are natural resources that cannot be replaced. Although nonrenewable resources are also found in nature, they are more harmful to the environment than renewable resources, such as, oil, gas and coal. About 71.5 percent of electricity in the U.S. is generated from these types of nonrenewable sources (EPA, 1997). Nonrenewable resources cannot be replaced once they have been used up, so they are not an ideal source of energy when compared to renewable resources.
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Mitigation Strategies and Solutions: Conserving Energy and Human Population 3 Conserving energy is extremely important because the world will not always be able to rely on nonrenewable resources. The Earth has a very limited amount of nonrenewable energy sources. It is important to conserve the current supply of nonrenewable sources and to use the renewable sources. This will allow for future generations to have our natural resources available. Conserving energy will limit the use of nonrenewable resources. The conservation of Energy is also important because the consumption of nonrenewable sources impacts our environment. Energy provides us with all of our modern day conveniences. Automobile transportation and electricity are just a few commonly used things that depend on a steady supply of energy. Energy consumption around the world has been continually increasing since 1982 (Berg & Hager, 2007). All of society can help solve these global issues. In the U.S., the average family’s energy use generates over 11,200 pounds of air pollutants each year. Every unit of electricity conserved reduces the environmental impact of energy use (EPA,
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2011 for the course COM 220 taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '08 term at University of Phoenix.

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Mitigation Strategies and Solutions - Mitigation Strategies...

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