NICHD -A2Love

NICHD -A2Love - Child Development, July/August 2003, Volume...

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Child Care Quality Matters: How Conclusions May Vary With Context John M. Love, Linda Harrison, Abraham Sagi-Schwartz, Marinus H. van IJzendoorn, Christine Ross, Judy A. Ungerer, Helen Raikes, Christy Brady-Smith, Kimberly Boller, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Jill Constantine, Ellen Eliason Kisker, Diane Paulsell, and Rachel Chazan-Cohen Three studies examined associations between early child care and child outcomes among families different from those in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Early Child Care Research Network study. Results suggest that quality is an important influence on children’s development and may be an important moderator of the amount of time in care. Thus, the generalizability of the NICHD findings may hinge on the context in which those results were obtained. These studies, conducted in three national contexts, with different regulatory climates, ranges of child care quality, and a diversity of family characteristics, suggest a need for more complete estimates of how both quality and quantity of child care may influence a range of young children’s developmental outcomes. Accumulated evidence suggests that for children in child care, the quality of that care is important for their development (Lamb, 1998; Love, Schochet, & Meckstroth, 1996), but findings differ with respect to the nature of the relationship of quality and quantity of care with various developmental outcomes. Although higher quality care has been associated with improved cognitive and language skills across a range of studies (e.g., see Campbell, Pungello, Miller-Johnson, Burchinal, & Ramey, 2001; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development [NICHD] Early Child Care Research Network, 2000b, 2003b), associations between care quality and social-emotional development have been more r 2003 by the Society for Research in Child Development, Inc. All rights reserved. 0009-3920/2003/7404-0004 John M. Love, Mathematica Policy Research; Linda Harrison, Charles Sturt University; Abraham Sagi-Schwartz, University of Haifa; Marinus H. van IJzendoorn, Leiden University; Christine Ross, Mathematica Policy Research; Judy A. Ungerer, Macquarie University; Helen Raikes, Society for Research in Child Develop- ment visiting scholar, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Christy Brady- Smith, Columbia University; Kimberly Boller, Mathematica Policy Research; Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Columbia University; Jill Con- stantine, Ellen Eliason Kisker, and Diane Paulsell, Mathematica Policy Research; Rachel Chazan-Cohen, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Harrison and Ungerer of the Sydney Family Development Project gratefully acknowledge the contributions made by Brent Waters and Bryanne Barnett in designing the Sydney Family Development Project, and the continual inspiration provided by Robyn Dolby. The research was supported by grants from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, the Australian Research Council, Macquarie University, University of New South Wales, and The University of Melbourne. Writing was
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2011 for the course PSYC 414 taught by Professor Aboud during the Fall '11 term at McGill.

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NICHD -A2Love - Child Development, July/August 2003, Volume...

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