Amoeba agriculture

Amoeba agriculture - nsf.gov - National Science Foundation...

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NSF Web Site Press Release 11-011 Like Humans, Amoebae Pack a Lunch Before They Travel Amoebae increase survival odds through rudimentary form of agriculture; finding has implications for human diseases "Fruiting bodies" discovered in amoebae collected in Virginia and Minnesota. Credit and Larger Version January 19, 2011 Some amoebae do what many people do. Before they travel, they pack a lunch. In results of a study reported today in the journal Nature , evolutionary biologists Joan Strassmann and David Queller of Rice University show that long-studied social amoebae Dictyostellum discoideum (commonly known as slime molds) increase their odds of survival through a rudimentary form of agriculture. Research by lead author Debra Brock, a graduate student at Rice, found that some amoebae sequester their food--particular strains of bacteria--for later use. "We now know that primitively social slime molds have genetic variation in their ability to farm beneficial bacteria as a food source," says George Gilchrist, program director in the National Science Foundation's Division of Environmental Biology, which funded the research. "But the catch is that with the benefits of a portable food source, comes the cost of harboring harmful bacteria." After these "farmer" amoebae aggregate into a slug, they migrate in search of nourishment--and form a fruiting body, or a stalk of dead amoebae topped by a sorus, a structure containing fertile spores. Then they release the bacteria-
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2011 for the course BIO 201 taught by Professor True during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Amoeba agriculture - nsf.gov - National Science Foundation...

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