Primate aging - nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF)...

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NSF Web Site Press Release 11-048 Study Finds Primates Age Gracefully Chimpanzees, gorillas and other primate, including humans, share similar aging rates and mortality gender gap Data from seven species of wild primates shows human aging patterns are not strikingly different. Credit and Larger Version March 10, 2011 A new study says chimps, gorillas and other primates grow old gracefully much like humans. The findings come from the first-ever multi-species comparison of primate aging patterns reported in the March 11 issue of Science . It was long thought that humans, who have relatively long life spans, age more slowly than other animals. But new research funded by the National Science Foundation's Division of Environmental Biology suggests the pace of human aging may not be so unique after all. We had good reason to think human aging was unique, said co-author Anne Bronikowski of Iowa State University. Humans, for example, live longer than many animals with some exceptions--parrots, seabirds, clams and tortoises. But humans are the longest-lived primates. "Humans live for many more years past our reproductive prime," Bronikowski said. "If we were like other mammals, we would start dying fairly rapidly after we reach mid-life. But we don't." Bronikowski is one of 11 biologists and anthropologists whose research figured into the study. "There's been this argument in the scientific literature for a long time that human
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Primate aging - nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF)...

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