Gunlock-Let them Eat Arugula

Gunlock-Let them Eat Arugula - Let Them Eat Arugula Julie...

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NATIONAL REVIEW ONLINE www.nationalreview.com PRINT JULIE GUNLOCK ARCHIVE | LATEST MAY 15, 2009 12:00 P.M. Let Them Eat Arugula Trendy food snobbery has soup kitchens going off course. T he $787-billion economic-stimulus plan signed by Pres. Barack Obama contained an often-overlooked section — $150 million for food banks and other organizations that provide food to people in need. Responding to reports that food banks were running out of provisions because of rising unemployment and higher food costs, Congress intervened to help stock the shelves. But taxpayers — the people paying for Congress’s charitable endeavors — should know that not all of these organizations are suffering. Some are even able to throw food away. Last month, Michelle Obama visited Miriam’s Kitchen, which serves the homeless in Washington, D.C. She ladled out mushroom risotto to the men and women waiting in line, had her picture taken, and talked about the importance of volunteering to meet the growing needs of families around the country. The trip to Miriam’s Kitchen was received as a very good thing — a very first-ladylike thing to do. But the first lady’s visit wasn’t just about the needs of the homeless; it was also very much about the food itself. In a Washington Post article covering the visit, one Miriam’s Kitchen official explained, “If anyone brings us donuts, Steve [the chef] throws them away. . . . It is not good food for our guests. We care too much
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