My_Ch9_lecture(2009030423470563)

My_Ch9_lecture(2009030423470563) - Chapter 9: Cellular...

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Chapter 9: Cellular Respiration Purpose : to understand the process of cellular respiration, including glycolysis, the Krebs cycle, and fermentation. What you MUST know from Ch 9: Oxidation vs. reduction Electron transport chain Glycolysis (summary) Krebs/citric acid cycle (summary) Cytochromes Chemiosmosis Fermentation (alcohol vs. lactic acid) Fermentation vs. respiration Note: “summary” means you know what these processes do and what they make, and how they differ from each other…NOT just know what they are. You will be held responsible for the information in Campbell’s chapter, which includes all of the above “need to know” topics. For the purpose of TRYING to maintain some sanity and lessen the lecture monotony, these notes follow Cliff’s chapter on Cellular Respiration, with a little Campbell’s thrown in. I would highly recommend that you get an AP Biology review book sooner, rather than later. It will help you to focus on the crucial “need to know” items for this chapter, which will then help you to wade through the minutiae of Campbell’s presentation.
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Cellular (Aerobic) Respiration Catabolic pathway (releases energy) Aerobic, because it occurs in the presence of oxygen; which is the reason why we need O 2 (not because we need it to breathe!) Oxygen enables our cells to make energy more efficiently from 1 molecule of glucose (C 6 H 12 O 6 ) than they can without oxygen. Chemical formula for the overall reaction: C 6 H 12 O 6 + 6O 2 → 6CO 2 + 6H 2 O + energy (ATP) Aerobic respiration is an oxidation-reduction reaction, catalyzed by enzymes. Electrons “fall” from organic molecules to oxygen, which is an electron acceptor. This occurs in a step-wise manner via NAD + and an electron transport chain located on the inner membrane of a mitochondrion. NAD + acts as an electron shuttle that takes electrons from glucose/other intermediate molecules and transfers them to oxygen. (Read pages 148- 152). 3 sequential metabolic pathways make up cellular respiration: glycolysis Krebs cycle (AKA citric acid cycle, TCA cycle)
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Electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation Glycolysis Glucose is oxidized to pyruvate (= pyruvic acid)
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My_Ch9_lecture(2009030423470563) - Chapter 9: Cellular...

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