My_Ch11_lecture(2009030423470679)

My_Ch11_lecture(2009030423470679) - Chapter 11Cell...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11—Cell Communication Purpose —to understand how cells respond to signals and regulate cellular activities and processes which are needed for the survival of the organism. (AP Major Themes V—Structure & Function, VI—Regulation) What you MUST know in Ch 11: Signal transduction Stages of signaling Ligand and G proteins Role of cyclic AMP When you study for the AP exam, you should consider that Cliff’s does not even cover this chapter (!)… so don’t spend a lot of time reviewing it (just know the general concepts listed above). BUT, for your unit test for this class, you’d better know this! Cells communicate with each other , most frequently through chemical signals, in order to regulate cellular activities and to react appropriately (so the cell and organism will survive any changes) to the surrounding environment. Signal transduction —is a series of steps by which a signal on a cell’s surface is converted into a specific cellular response. Evolved very early in ancient prokaryotes and single-celled eukaryotes (for example yeast cells identifying a mate of the opposite sex, Fig 11.1, pg 189) Then adapted for use by multicellular organisms Communicating cells may be nearby or far apart
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
o Local regulator —is a substance that affects cells (makes them do specific things) growth factors stimulate the nearby target cells to grow and multiply neurotransmitters are chemical signals that are released by the end of 1 nerve cell (neuron) in response to an electrical signal. The neurotransmitter then crosses the synapse (space between nerve cells) and forms weak bonds with the specific receptors on the adjacent nerve cell. Thus the nerve signal is transmitted or sent from 1 neuron to the next one. http://fig.cox.miami.edu/~cmallery/150/neuro/c7.48.17.synapse.jpg Someone won a Nobel prize for discovering this! So it must be important…
Background image of page 2
Dr. Earl W. Sutherland : Vanderbilt University, 1971 Nobel Prize, Physiology/Medicine. Epinephrine stimulates breakdown of glycogen in liver and skeletal cells by activating an enzyme ONLY when there were intact cells—with an intact plasma membrane…inferring that cell signaling involved receptors in the plasma membrane. And he and his lab discovered cyclic AMP. Pretty much figured out most of Ch 11 (specifically,
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 10

My_Ch11_lecture(2009030423470679) - Chapter 11Cell...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online